Avoiding problems, Career, Customers, Practical examples

Communication issues? Maybe it’s engagement issues

December 24, 2017

I started thinking on this article as my self year’s end retrospective. And I realized the biggest thing I learned during this year regards engagement.

I’ve been hearing, for years, that “80% of the projects that fail, fail because of poor communication”. That’s a sad true, but this year I realized this is an easy but messy abstraction. When you say that communication is the problem, you are hiding many serious problems, not only in your project, but also in your organization. And after that eureka moment, a new one came: people do “communicate the proper way” if they are engaged and have support to develop themselves.

 

Some examples
  1. We have a contract to watch an online app. It’s not very critical, but we still have SLAs to accomplish when it’s down. Then one issue comes and the person from OPS forgets to tell the customer, during the first 15 minutes, that he’s looking for a solution. Beyond that, he takes one more hour to solve the problem, than the 4h regularly expected. It will cause an argument during a meeting between the managers and everybody will finish the subject saying that they had a communication issue;
  2. We evolve a very critical solution, that deals with money, to a customer. Then the developer didn’t create the automatized test and the app breaks when goes to production. It will cause an argument during a meeting between the managers, and everybody will agree that the QA guy didn’t communicate properly to the DEV guy about the missing test.
  3. The project manager tells the project is delayed, but doesn’t tell how much it is. When something goes bad and someone ask for it, he defends himself saying he told about the delay, and had an interpretation issue because those who read didn’t understand the message he wanted to say. Then after that meeting, everybody will agree that he haven’t communicated the right way;

 

Why these things happen

What I learned during this year, regarding engagement, was to identify why these examples happened:

  1. The person from OPS team didn’t tell the customer he was working at the first 15 minutes, and forgot to tell he would take one more hour to solve the ticket, because he was not well empowered of its position. He doesn’t understands his position. If he forgets to tell the customer about the down time, the customer won’t be able tell the users. The users will start calling the call center, and it will generate an overhead on the call center team. So at least 10 people will have more work to do, forcing the company to pay for that extra hours, because of one missing news. The person from OPS wouldn’t have forgot to tell anyone needed if he truly understood the scenario.
  2. The second example has nothing to the QA. The responsibility affects the developer. He hadn’t created the test because he doesn’t know that every one hour of that system stopped, makes the customer to loose US$ 10.000,00. Nobody, when old, will want to tell stories to their children like “hey, once I stopped the production environment, and screwed many people’s life”. So the developer was negligent about the test because he is not well empowered of its responsibilities and capabilities.
  3. The project manager will is not to hide information. He gets paid, essentially, to keep people informed. When he waits one or two months to say the project is delayed for 2 months, he doesn’t think the people from project will be needed in a next one, and it will cause a loss on the company. Since people won’t be available, the original project’s budget won’t be enough, and the whole company will spend more money to hire new people to the next one.

So if you are inside any of these examples, think on the other side as your true friend. Would you let, any of these examples to happen, if you knew how deep it would affect them?

 

Solving the wrong way

It’s easy to put all these problems inside one basket and label them as communication issues. Then, our technical minds will think about processes to guarantee that:

  1. The tickets system automatically send and email telling the customer we’re working to solve the issue;
  2. We will create an integration between the task acceptance tool and the code repository to check if all the tasks have at least one test designed;
  3. The project manager will always present the status report having the customer on it’s side, so no information will be missed again;

The suggestions above are not wrong and shouldn’t be faced as something to be avoided. But they must be the last alternative. They are all mending to lack of people engagement.

 

Solving the right way: build together

People tend to be good. When you share the right way their responsibilities and how their activities affect each other, they will feel inside the group and will always try to help everybody. So why not asking each one of the actors of these examples how they would solve the problem? Present the problem, tell everything that happened because of their behavior. How to solve? This is the most difficult part. Probably the first thing coming from them won’t be the perfect solution or the solution you thought. Then it’s time for to show a better solution and check if it makes sense to those who will put it in practice. A mix of the ideias can be a good start.

And now we talk about people’s maturity to solve problems:

  • If they are junior people with good potential, just letting them to know their responsibilities can solve the problem. They have good intentions! They won’t forget to tell anybody the next time about what’s happening;
  • If they are overwhelmed, you will advice about looking for self management tools. And also will help them to focus on what is important and not getting overwhelmed again;
  • If you realize its needed, why not using one of the process solutions described above as the wrong way? Take care because if must make sense to everybody affected. It depends on people maturity to not feel pushed;

 

The main goal is to look for a mindset of empowering and networks, as described on the image below:

 

Always have next steps

Once I was invited to join a retrospective. The goal was to help a team with an external vision so they could improve their processes. The first thing I asked was where the “next steps” of the previous retrospective were. For my surprise they weren’t.

Always keep track of goals and results. It gives you sense of improvement, and if it doesn’t it will be clear to find where new mistakes were made. Have a periodic checkpoint with each one of the scenarios above until it fits a track where the problems don’t happen again.

After that, when you have the whole solution, you will be able to share your good practice to other teams around you:

  • What happened; Why happened; When happened;
  • What did you do to solve it, what were the first trials, and what actually solved it?
  • What did you learn from it? Next steps;

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